• Gallery
  • This Mexican matrix opal has been with Christine for a loooong time. Deep cherry red, it is a glorious stone and has founds its place in a double ring, set alongside golden keshi pearls and small cubes of rough diamond.
  • A detailed look into the cherry opal. Spellbinding.
  • Another commission necklace, featuring a gold nugget and diamonds from inherited rings. After many years in the drawer, these have come to life.
  • For the index finger of the left hand, the small chrysoprase cabochons below the central stone in this ring are on show and provide tactile highlights for the thumb to play with.
  • The blue agate, chalcedony, anchors a group of star sapphires in various colours. Mostly silver with gold highlights. Double ring.
  • A single cabochon labradorite (feldspar, cousin of the moonstone) on a gold band. Simple, expressive, beautiful colour, a great ring to enjoy on a daily basis.
  • Our favourite stone, Citrine, (our house is named after it) cut by Munsteiner is married to a golden pearl, with a diamond to complete (it really needs the diamond!). Silver one end, moving to gold at the other. An eye catching double ring.
  • A freshwater pearl in a silver cuff (bangle), paired with tourmalines, fire opal and maccle diamond. Elements of gold warm the scene.
  • Gold in quartz: the prospector’s dream of finding a seam of this material is reflected in these slices, together with chrome diopside. Long stirrups ensure they stay in place, even whilst brushing hair.
  • Detail of a commission necklace with a Canadian ammolite fossil.
  • Two magnificent tourmalines sit majestically in 18ct gold as a double ring. The chartreuse colour is continued in the smaller bicolour stone.
  • China is at last producing good quality freshwater pearls, similar to the Japanese Biwa pearls of 25 years ago. With a pink moonstone and rutile quartz beads, these colours are really warm and gentle.
  • A large boulder opal from Australia sits beside a moonstone, fire opal and garnet on a silver shank. Gold detailing mixes the metals. Ideal for the middle finger.
  • On addressing my Aunty Beryl, I was never aware she was named after a stone group! Aquamarine, emerald and morganite (pink) make the group, lovely pastel lentil shapes that roll on wearing. A delight.
  • Three pearls, two black and one golden adorn this single ring; a diamond completes the grouping on a strong yellow gold band for a delicious sculpture.
  • Munsteiner carved this striped agate back in the 80s, his classic style. Turned to a flower vase, with pearls, it makes a versatile necklace.
  • For the index finger of the right hand, this Mexican opal in yellow gold is a mesmerizing to observe in sunlight.
  • Epidot in quartz: another of Christine’s speciality finds, enhanced with a flower out of citrine. Note the large silver ring in the chain, balancing the stones.
  • Two bands define this double ring, seating a black pearl between the middle and ring fingers (thus lowering its profile). An emerald with tourmaline needles and some diamonds complete the picture.
  • Our wedding bands! After 35 years, mine (left) needed a rebuild, whilst Christine had treated hers more gently. In celebration, we replaced the coloured diamonds with Spirit Sun cut stones in River (E) quality. We are delighted with the renewed sparkle to our togetherness.
  • A group of Australian opals with a green garnet and coloured diamond. Very pretty.
  • Tsavolite, the green garnet, catches the eye; this double ring has a quartz, with inclusions, by Munsteiner and elements of white and yellow gold.
The Artist Goldsmith